Philippines flag
Philippines flag
The National Flag of the Philippines (Pambansang Watawat ng Pilipinas), popularly known as the Three Stars and a Sun, is a horizontal flag bicolor with equal bands of royal blue and scarlet red, and with a white equilateral triangle at the hoist; in the center of the triangle is a golden yellow sun with eight primary rays and at each vertex of the triangle is a small, five-pointed golden yellow star




    Philippines flag
Philippines flag - facts at a glance
Name Pambansang Watawat
("National Flag")
Nickname Tatlong Bituin at Isang Araw
(Three Stars and a Sun)
Designer Emilio Aguinaldo
Adopted June 12, 1898
(original version)
February 12, 1998
(current version)
Flag Day May 28
Proportion 1:2


    Philippines flag
Philippines flag colors - meaning/symbolism
 Blue stands for the willingness to sacrifice oneself for freedom, peace, truth and justice
 Red symbolizes courage and patriotism
 Golden sun with eight rays symbolizes unity, freedom, people's democracy, and sovereignty. The eight rays represent that started the 1896 Philippine Revolution against Spain - Manila, Cavite, Bulacan, Pampanga, Nueva Ecija, Tarlac, Laguna, and Batangas
 White equilateral triangle symbolizes liberty, equality and fraternity
 Three five-pointed stars stand for the three major groups of islands where the revolution started: Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao


Eight-rayed golden sun represents 8 provinces


Philippines flag

What is Philippines flag?

meaning of the eight rays of the Sun on the Philippine flag
The eight-rayed golden sun on the Philippines Flag symbolizes unity, freedom, people's democracy, and sovereignty. Each ray represents a province with significant involvement in the 1896 Philippine Revolution against Spain - Manila, Bulacan, Cavite, Pampanga, Tarlac, Laguna, Batangas, and Nueva Ecija. The symbolism given in the 1898 Proclamation declares that the sun represents the gigantic steps made by the sons of the country along the path of Progress and Civilization, and lists Bataan instead of Tarlac among the eight provinces symbolized by the sun's rays. The rays of the official eight-ray sun should have 3.75°-spacing

Philippines flag information


Philippines flag

What is Philippines flag?

The National Flag of the Philippines (Pambansang Watawat ng Pilipinas), popularly known as the Three Stars and a Sun, is a horizontal flag bicolor with equal bands of royal blue and scarlet red, and with a white equilateral triangle at the hoist; in the center of the triangle is a golden yellow sun with eight primary rays and at each vertex of the triangle is a small, five-pointed golden yellow star

Philippines flag day



Philippines flag


When is Philippines flag day?

The National Flag Day in the Philippines is celebrated every 28 May, the day of the 1898 Battle of Alapan. The official National Flag flying period starts from May 28 and ends on Independence Day, June 12, every year, although the flying period for the flag in homes, businesses and public establishments may start on a specified day of May to be given by the National Historical Commission of the Philippines and may last till June 30.

Philippines flag history

Philippines flag
Philippines flag history
The flag of Cuba influenced the design of the flag of the Philippines as Cuba's revolution against Spain inspired the Philippine Revolution. During the Philippine Revolution, Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo, President of the Revolutionary Government, conceived the flag's design and the first flag was sewn at 535 Morrison Hill Road, Hongkong by Mrs. Marcela Marino Agoncillo - wife of the first Filipino diplomat Felipe Agoncillo, with the help of her daughter Lorenza and Mrs. Delfina Herbosa Natividad, niece of Dr. Jose Rizal and wife of Gen. Salvador Natividad.
It was displayed for the first time in a battle on May 28, 1898 To commemorate that event, May 28 is chosen as Philippines flag day.
On June 12, 1898, the Philippine Flag brought from Hong Kong was unfurled for the first time at the historic window of the Aguinaldo Mansion in Kawit, Cavite as the country's Independence was being proclaimed before the Filipino people.
The earlier design of the current Philippine flag was conceptualized by Emilio Aguinaldo during his exile in Hong Kong in 1897. The first flag was sewn by Marcela Marino de Agoncillo with the help of her daughter Lorenza and Delfina Herbosa de Natividad (a niece of Propagandista José Rizal). It was first displayed in the Battle of Alapan on May 28, 1898. The flag was formally unfurled during the proclamation of independence on June 12, 1898 in Kawit, Cavite.
The original design of the flag adopted a mythical sun with a face influenced by Latin American republics Argentina, Peru, and Uruguay; a triangle, representing the Katipunan which inspired by the Eye of Providence in the Great Seal of the United States and the Masonic Triangle and which enshrined Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité; the stripes and colors derived from the American flag.

    Philippines War Flag

    If Philippines is at war, the national flag will be flown upside down with the red band at the top. To indicate a state of war, the red field is flown upwards and is placed on the right (on the observer's left) if it is in a hanging position. The war flag was used during the Philippine–American War from 1899 to 1901, World War II by the Philippine Commonwealth from 1941 to 1945 and by the Japanese-sponsored Philippine Republic when it declared war against the United Kingdom and the United States in 1944, the coup attempts during President Corazon Aquino's administration, and EDSA III.
    Philippines war flag
    Flag of the President of the Philippines
    The Flag of the President of the Philippines shall consist of the Coat-of-Arms of the President in proper colors in a rectangular blue background. The Coat-of-Arms consists of a circular blue shield with the eight-rayed Philippine sun ravonnant in golden yellow; on the center, an equilateral triangle in gules (red); overall the traditional sea lion of the Coat of Arms granted to the City of Manila in 1596, on guard with sword, or at hilt and one mullet in golden yellow in the corner of each of the three angles of the equilateral triangle: one mullet representing Luzon; one, Visayas; and another, Mindanao. The whole, surrounded by stars in the form of an amulet with one point of each star outward on the imaginary radiating center lines, the number of stars conforming to the number of provinces of the Republic at any given time.
    Philippines President's flag

    Philippines flag display rules


    Philippines flag
    Philippines Flag protocol
    By law, the Philippine flag must be permanently hoisted and illuminated at night at the following locations:
    Malacañang Palace, the official residence of the President of the Philippines
    Congress of the Philippines buildings
    Senate of the Philippines building
    House of Representatives of the Philippines building (Batasang Pambansa Complex)
    Supreme Court of the Philippines building
    Rizal Monument in Luneta, Manila
    Aguinaldo Shrine in Kawit, Cavite
    Barasoain Shrine in Malolos, Bulacan
    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
    Libingan ng mga Bayani
    Mausoleo de los Veteranos de la Revolución
    All international ports of entry
    All other places as may be designated by the National Historical Institute as such
    The flag may be flown at half-mast as a sign of mourning. Upon the official announcement of the death of the President or a former President, the flag should be flown at half-mast for ten days. The flag should be flown at half-mast for seven days following the death of the Vice President, the Chief Justice, the President of the Senate or the Speaker of the House of Representatives.
    The flag may also be required to fly at half-mast upon the death of other persons to be determined by the National Historical Institute, for a period less than seven days. The flag shall be flown at half-mast on all the buildings and places where the decedent was holding office, on the day of death until the day of interment of an incumbent member of the Supreme Court, the Cabinet, the Senate or the House of Representatives, and such other persons as may be determined by the National Historical Institute.
    When flown at half-mast, the flag should be first hoisted to the peak for a moment then lowered to the half-mast position. It should be raised to the peak again before it is lowered for the day.
    The flag may also be used to cover the caskets of the dead of the military, veterans of previous wars, national artists, and outstanding civilians as determined by the local government. In such cases, the flag must be placed such that the white triangle is at the head and the blue portion covers the right side of the casket. The flag should not be lowered to the grave or allowed to touch the ground, but should be solemnly folded and handed to the heirs of the deceased.

Pledge of Allegiance to the Philippine Flag

Philippines Flag
Pledge of Allegiance to the Philippine Flag
The Pledge of Allegiance to the Philippine Flag (Panunumpa ng Katapatan sa Watawat ng Pilipinas) is one of two national pledges, the other being the Patriotic Oath, which is the Philippine national pledge. The Pledge of Allegiance to the Philippine Flag is recited at flag ceremonies immediately after the Patriotic Oath or, if the Patriotic Oath is not recited, after the national anthem. The pledge was approved by then-President Fidel V. Ramos on Independence Day (June 12), 1996. The law requires the pledge to be recited while standing with the right hand with palm open raised shoulder high.

Filipino Version English translation
Ako ay Pilipino I am a Filipino
Buong katapatang nanunumpa I pledge my allegiance
Sa watawat ng Pilipinas To the flag of the Philippines
At sa bansang kanyang sinasagisag And to the country it represents
Na may dangal, katarungan at kalayaan With honor, justice and freedom
Na pinakikilos ng sambayanang Put in motion by one Nation
Maka-Diyos For God
Makatao for the People,
Makakalikasan at for Nature and
Makabansa for the Country

Philippine flag construction

Philippines Flag construction
The flag's length is twice its width, giving it an aspect ratio of 1:2. The length of all the sides of the white triangle are equal to the width of the flag. Each star is oriented in such manner that one of its tips points towards the vertex at which it is located. Moreover, the gap-angle between two neighbours of the 8 ray-bundles is as large as the angle of one ray-bundle (so 22.5°), with each major ray having double the thickness of its two minor rays. The golden sun is not exactly in the center of the triangle but shifted slightly to the right.
Philippines Flag construction


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